RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Non-Candy Halloween Treats Kids Actually Love

October 20, 2017 1:36 am

Armies of Moms have puzzled over the years about non-candy Halloween giveaways that will bring a smile to the most discerning little ghosts and goblins.

The fact is, for most young children, the fun of trick-or-treating door-to-door in costume is more exciting than the treats they happen to collect – and many parents confiscate most of the sweet stuff anyway once it reaches home.  

A panel of parents brainstorming at a PTA meeting in California came up with a formidable list of stuff that makes a great alternative to candy treats.

More good ideas can likely be found at your nearby dollar store.

Food treats:

Juice boxes – Little trick or treaters can work up a thirst. Be sure to choose no-sugar added juices.

Fruit cups – Tie a black or orange ribbon around individual cups of applesauce or other cut-up fruit.  

Granola bars – Kids never get tired of these chewy little treats. Seasonal pumpkin-flavored varieties are available.

Raisins – Those tiny little boxes of raisins seem to appeal to kids of all ages.

Baked chips – They may be fairly empty calories, but they‘re a sugarless, kid-friendly treat.

Non-food treats:

Slime – little plastic containers of slime are a natural pick for the icky Halloween season.

Plastic body parts – Little kids are sure to get a kick out of plastic lips, noses, or fingernails.

Action figures – These or other small toys, such as Hot Wheels cars, are favored by  kids and great for trading.

Instant tattoos – Wash-off Halloween tattoos are widely available at this time of the year.

Play-doh – Individual containers of colorful Play-doh are a hit no matter the time of year.

Bubbles – Another perennial favorite, plastic bottles of magic bubbles are  a treat for most younger kids.

Stickers – You’ll find vast arrays of popular Halloween-themed stickers at almost any toy, drug or big-box store.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tips for Stocking and Maintaining Your Medicine Cabinet

October 20, 2017 1:36 am

Many of us have old bottles and boxes that hang around in our medicine cabinet for years. However, keeping on top of the products in your medicine cabinet can make or break an oncoming bout of flu or fever. Below are a handful of tips from MultiVu for stocking and maintaining your arsenal.

When in doubt, throw it out. Once you've opened a medication the clock starts ticking on its shelf life. Items like that are usually good for about a year from when they're opened. Regularly check the expiration date on your product.

Everyday basics. A variety of illnesses are common during the winter months. Basics include good oral hygiene and it's very important and it starts with clean teeth.   

Must-haves for flu season. No one wants a cold to persist, so don't let it slow you down. Medical studies have shown that zinc gluconate, which is found in lozenges such as Cold-EEZE, shortens the duration of a cold so you can feel better faster.

Other essentials. While antibiotics are often used to treat cold and flu, they can disrupt your balance of friendly and unfriendly bacteria, creating digestive discomfort. Probiotics are a great medicine cabinet staple because they help balance healthy bacteria levels in your gut and, since 70 percent of your immune system lives in your digestive tract, they support a healthy immune system as well. When choosing a probiotic, look for the dosing information, otherwise known as the CFU count. CFUs refer to the number of good bacteria in the supplement. For example, on the lower end, probiotics with 2 billion CFU can help support everyday digestive health, while additional CFUs on the higher end can help bolster immune support.

Storing and discarding. Rethink where you keep your medicines. Humidity from steamy showers can expedite the expiry of medication. It's best to keep them in a child-safe, dry, and cool place. And landfill sites and water supplies have become contaminated with discarded medicines. Participating in a community drug take back program or a trip to the pharmacy are the best ways to discard old or unneeded medications.

Source: MultiVu

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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